What Is a Residential Demolition Permit?

What Is a Residential Demolition Permit?

Disclaimer: The website may collect compensation for links, mentions and/or videos that are placed in the content.

Disclosure: All content is intended for general information purposes only. We are not professionals in any specialized field. Please consult an expert before making any decisions involving your health, finances, or general well being.

Some people get confused about what they need to start a demolition project. The truth is, you’re going to need a residential demolition permit. Here are six things you should know about residential demolition permits.


Video Source

1. A Residential Demolition Permit is a Legal Document

It’s a document that gives you the authority to demolish a building structure. So just as you need to have a building permit for construction, you also need a demolition permit to demolish.

2. A Demolition Permit Is Needed Under Different Circumstances

You will need a demolition permit if structures should be removed from a lot, demolishing accessory structures, and when undertaking a renovation project.

3. Instances That Don’t Need a Demolition Permit

This may vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but you will usually no longer need a permit if you only remove a small structure like a garage, shed, deck, or porch.

4. Compliance With Requirements

You will need a complete permit application, grading plan, inspected and completed plumbing permit, and cash demolition escrow bond.

5. Things to Consider Before Demolition

Before demolition, make sure you have completed the following essential steps:

  • Determine your proposed work
  • Check the notification period
  • Understanding the site control
  • Deconstruction ordinance requirements
  • Determine the soil needs

6. Inspection of Project

Of course, the local jurisdiction will inspect the project throughout the process. It won’t just end once the demolition permit is approved.

.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

RSS
Follow by Email
LinkedIn
Share